New song by New York death metal band Castrator is an ode to feminist activist Malala Yousafzai


Castrator is a New York-based “international project” that formed in 2013, released their debut EP No casualties in 2015, and are now releasing their first feature film, Stained in oblivion, on July 22 via Dark Descent Records. The explicitly feminist death metal band promises to create “a brutal experience that will leave the listener excited but bloodied between their legs” and to “dominate and emasculate the world”, and their new collection of anti-patriarchal brutality includes nine original songs and a cover of “Countess Bathory” from Venom; see the track list below.

We’ve teamed up with Castrator and Dark Descent for an exclusive pressing of Stained in oblivion, on 140g vinyl “neon violet with black galaxy” and limited to only 100 copies. Pre-order yours HERE while they last. Here is a mockup of the vinyl:

Castrator – Stained into Oblivion

After sharing “Tyrant’s Verdict” from the album and its accompanying video, which was filmed, directed and edited by drummer Carolina Perez with Stephanie Gentry, Castrator shared another new single, “Dawa of Yousafzai.” Here’s some info on the song, via Decibel:

The song is about Malala Yousafzai, a young Pakistani girl who has spoken out publicly against the Taliban’s ban on girls’ education. She survived an assassination attempt at the age of 15 when she was shot in the head. After that, she grew even fiercer and is now an activist and spokesperson for children and girls around the world.
The song’s intro is his speech at the UN convention in 2013.

Watch the lyric video for it, and the “Tyrant’s Verdict” video, below.

CASTRATOR – FORGOTTEN PROFILES LIST OF TRACKS
1. Dawa of Yousafzai
2. Tormented by atrocities
3. Fouling my existence
4. Sins of the Inquisition
5. Voice of Evirato
6. Abandoned and Private
7. Sinister Spirit
8. Purge the rotten (those)
9. The Tyrant’s Verdict
10. Countess Bathory (Venom cover)

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